Tagged: information security

23
Mar
2020

Information Security in the Age of COVID-19

The Hacker News is running several interesting articles related to information security and COVID-19 as they relate to emerging threats. Specifically, the threats that a newly mobilized remote workforce faces when many of them have little on detecting threats outside of their normal work environment. While the article referenced specifically touts Cynet’s service offering, the guidance offered is applicable across the board.

Take for example, all of your new remote workers who are receiving all or some of their direction via personal communication channels whether they be phone, SMS, or email. How many of these staff are capable of discerning phishing messages on their personal devices? It is one thing when they have a corporate suite of products assisting them to make these judgement calls, but when they don’t have those can they still be trusted to determine who the bad actors are? In all likelihood the answer is going to be that remote workers are going to be less capable of protecting themselves without new training programs and time to become acclimated to their new reality. COVID-19, however, has made it so there is no time to do so in the face of mandates to have 100% of your workforce out of the office. Introducing new training for these workers about how to protect themselves in this chaotic time is going to be crucial not only for them but also for the well being of the organization as a whole. In addition to training, all information security teams should be looking at how to best to detect unauthorized data loss as well as unauthorized access into corporate networks. It also goes without saying that any remote access solutions should also be protected by two-factor authentication.

Be well, be safe, and secure your networks.

23
Jan
2020

Microsoft Exposes Elasticsearch Database to the World

Security Week reports that Microsoft has suffered a mishap with a handful of its Elasticsearch databases causing approximately 250 million customer support records to be exposed. While financial information for these clients was not exposed, it does appear that the data could be used for phishing attacks and tech support scams.

Of course the kicker is that Microsoft runs one of the largest cloud services on earth where users must take great pains to secure these systems that they setup. Now it turns out the company running these types of services can’t secure their own systems. While I know that these Elasticsearch databases were not really part of the Azure cloud service, it does beg the question that if Microsoft can’t secure their own systems, how can their clients ever hope to completely secure their own systems in the Azure cloud. If nothing else, this should serve as a reminder that no company, person, organization, etc. is immune to security lapses and great care should always be taken to secure both internal and cloud systems.

03
Dec
2019

VNC Client and Server Software Vulnerabilities Found

The Hacker News reports that dozens of new VNC client and server vulnerabilities have been found in the open source versions of the tools used by IT departments all over the world. If you are like me and think “VNC, who uses that any more?” then you should go check out a YouTube video by Tobias M├Ądel where he connects to open VNC servers all over the internet. Sure, the video is from 2015, but when you think about how quickly industrial plant management software and device firmware is updated you can bet money that there are still plenty of open VNC servers still running and accessible.

The moral of the story? Don’t expose critical systems and services (like RDP and VNC) over the internet unless it is absolutely essential. If it is essential, and you can’t put them behind a VPN, then you had better use a very strong and complex password to secure the access. Even with a VPN you should do that. Lastly, you need to makes sure you and any vendor you are purchasing software and devices from have a strong policy of pushing out updates anytime a vulnerability is found. You can’t afford to wait five years for an update when your chemical plan control system is left completely exposed on the internet through remote access software flaws.