Tagged: data

23
Jan
2020

Microsoft Exposes Elasticsearch Database to the World

Security Week reports that Microsoft has suffered a mishap with a handful of its Elasticsearch databases causing approximately 250 million customer support records to be exposed. While financial information for these clients was not exposed, it does appear that the data could be used for phishing attacks and tech support scams.

Of course the kicker is that Microsoft runs one of the largest cloud services on earth where users must take great pains to secure these systems that they setup. Now it turns out the company running these types of services can’t secure their own systems. While I know that these Elasticsearch databases were not really part of the Azure cloud service, it does beg the question that if Microsoft can’t secure their own systems, how can their clients ever hope to completely secure their own systems in the Azure cloud. If nothing else, this should serve as a reminder that no company, person, organization, etc. is immune to security lapses and great care should always be taken to secure both internal and cloud systems.

11
Nov
2019

Your People Are Your Biggest Threat

The Hacker News has an article posted from November 7th about a rogue TrendMicro employee stealing customer data and selling it to a tech support scammer. This goes to show, once again, that your people are always your biggest threat. Whether they are clicking on malicious links in from that prince who sent them an email or actively stealing data to sell on the black market, they are likely going to do something to cause you serious pain. Many companies don’t know how to combat these threats or are completely oblivious to what their people may be doing. Here are some ideas to help protect your organization:

  1. Invest in training – Train, train, train, and then train your staff again to be vigilant and know how to recognize a malicious email, phone call, or text message before they divulge any information. If they fall for one, deliver on-the-spot training to help them learn from their mistake.
  2. Invest in more than your average anti-virus software – Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs) are the buzzword of the decade. While you don’t need to listen to all the marketing hype, you should have a host based security solution on your PCs and servers that does more than just look for known signatures. It needs to identify unknown threats as well as known threats, block ransomware, stop data being transferred to removable storage, and more.
  3. Adopt a policy of least privilege – Does that receptionist really need local administrative privileges on their PC? Does that staff trainer really need access to the marketing database? I don’t think so. If people don’t need access to data, make sure they can’t get to it.
  4. Classify your data – What is in that random word document on the accounting shared drive? Is it something that shouldn’t leave the building? If it is, make sure you are tagging the document and putting restrictions in place on your firewalls to stop it from leaving. Do this for all of your data and put rules in place to protect it where it is stored.
  5. Invest in Data Loss Prevention (DLP) tools – Make sure data isn’t leaving your organization. Have tools that can observe data movement, alert, and stop it from happening if needed.
  6. Protect your data from and in the Cloud – Invest in Cloud Access Security Brokers (CASBs) if you allow your staff to store data and work in the cloud. You don’t want data stored improperly in services like Slack, Office 365, Dropbox, Gmail, or somewhere else.

There are many other things you could do as well, but I would argue if you have these tools in place and configured properly, you just might avoid ending up like TrendMicro.

03
Apr
2019

Facebook is at It Again

Our friends over at ZDNet just released another report on Facebook and their ongoing security woes. This time, Facebook has been caught asking users to confirm their identity by entering their email address and their password for their email service provider so that the platform can login to handle this confirmation. It goes without saying that anyone asking you for the user name and password you use at another service provider is not looking out for your best interests. With Facebook asking for these credentials and their recent issues, you know they are definitely not looking out for your best interests.

TL;DR – Don’t give Facebook your credentials to other services. It’s bad.